Yearly Archives: 2013


“This is the kind of curriculum I’d write if I wrote one!” 1

I was in Miami this past Friday working with teachers to help them implement the thematic chemistry curriculum I developed. I love doing these post-adoption trainings for so many reason.  First, I love working with teachers!  I love hearing their stories of what is going on in their classroom and helping them figure out ways […]


Myth #3 of Mastery Learning – Kids that are behind will never catch up

It’s been a while since my first two “Myths of Mastery Learning” posts.  The first was on the myth that mastery learning is a self-taught learning environment.  The second is that the reason we don’t use mastery learning all over the place now is because it didn’t work. This third one is something that I […]


Student-paced mastery learning lets students know they matter

You Matter. Angela Maiers started a movement (Choose2Matter.org) based on these two simple words with a talk at a TEDx about the power of these words. But it’s about more than those words – it’s the power of showing people that they are noticed.  They are seen. It’s moving, it’s amazing, it’s heart-warming, and it’s […]


7 Skills for Life-Long Learning and How to Address Them

A large number of district, schools and classrooms that include “create life-long learners” among their goals.  But what are the skills really necessary to learn throughout your life?  And are we really addressing those goals in the best possible ways? The changes that I believe are necessary to better work on these skills (and therefore […]


“Student paced” versus/and “mastery learning”

My post from yesterday described how my 8 year old daughter, out of no where, saw the need the for individualized instruction and instituted it in her “classroom” (her bedroom where she plays teacher).  When I tweeted about the new post I used “#masterylearning” but then I stopped and added a new one I hadn’t […]


Science is a verb – and how to shift lab paradigms to reflect it 1

I read a wonderful post lately about the use of models in science classrooms.  In it, Drew Roman wrote: “The second greatest mistake in science education is to teach the book of knowledge in isolation from the process of scientific inquiry, or with process itself defined as a recipe to memorize.” (I also happen to […]